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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
and oil and rigged containers to explode. james holmes' apartment is at the top and according to an fbi bob technician, he said that holmes told him that he took a boom box and remote control car and placed it outside of a garage car. he said there was a cd that he made. the first 40 minutes was silent to timed out to start playing very loud music. holmes hoped that somebody would come over to that trash bag and then see the remote control car and start playing with it. except that remote control was was not triggered to move the car. it was triggered to set off a device inside the apartment and that would trigger a much larger explosion. according to the fbi bomb technician, james holmes planned to have his apartment explode to distract and overwhelm first responders and he would walk into the theater a few miles away and start shooting. it's the kind of elaborate diabolical plot that seems to work for villains in a batman movie but in real life this diabolical part of the plan didn't work. and, wolf, investigators also testified today that in the month leading up to the shooting james
but remained on the f.b.i.'s radar. he was extradited last week when his name surfaced into an investigation on a suicide bombing attack on the new york subway system that failed to be pulled off. he is the 8th defendant to face charges in brooklyn for the failed subway plot. you may remember one of his alleged coconspirators who pled guilty back in 2010. he and others were communicating with a shado shadowy al-qaida member. they were e-mailing phrases, such as marriage. he was stopped and the plot was foiled. nasir was using the name language as zazi while communicating with this guy in pack sthapb and was part of this kpheur to commit multiple terrorist attacks and that's why the u.s. attorney in the u.s. was able tow prosecute him. that first appearance scheduled about two hours from now. jenna we'll look forward to developments on that case. thank you. jon: a big take down for the f.b.i. to tell you about. federal agents scratching a name off their most wanted list, after this man is arrested on the other side of the world. details on the bust and his alleged crimes coming up. plus, heav
status and resettled in the united states were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al-qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated in against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee who was charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged security screenings have been expanded to more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who have already been settled in the united states. and according to press reports this february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with ties to al-qaeda is much broader than previously believed. fbi director robert mueller stated last year during congressional testimony before the house intelligence committee that he continues to be concerned with, quote, individuals who have been resettled here in the united states that have some associa
budgets of the fbi, bureau of alcohol, tobacco crossfire arms and explosives, drug enforcement administration, and secret service. the number criminal prosecutions for immigration related violations has skyrocketed, now accounting for more than half of all criminal prosecutions of the federal level. the report's authors conclude obama's top priority when it comes to law enforcement. illinois is said to become the latest to allow undocumented immigrants to obtain driver's licenses. the governor has pledged to sign a new bill that will allow about 250,000 immigrants to become licensed drivers. only washington and new mexico currently allow licenses for undocumented people while utah allows driving permits. connecticut recently announced young immigrants who qualify for the obama administration's deferred action program to apply for driver's licenses. a federal judge in manhattan has dealt a major setback to the stop and frisk. tuesday, the judge of u.s. district court for the southern district of new york ruled police are not allowed to routinely stop pedestrians outside a privat
briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigation and prosecution are all preserved. if you asked me to break down how much intelligence versus how much law enforcement work we do, i would be hard pressed to give you an answer. we are almost always pursuing multiple tracks at the same time. we no longer have to across organizational lines to bring tools and talent to bear against a particular threat or problem. for instance, our office lawyers in the office of intelligence work day in and day out with the intelligence community to secure authorities under the surveillance
over each of the 166 counts against james holmes. we also heard from an fbi bomb tech, an atf supervisor, who testified about the extent to which holmes booby-trapped his apartment with homemade napalm, propane and gas triggers. in the two months leading up tote shooting holmes purchased 6295 rounds of ammunition as well as tear gas, ballistic gear and handcuffs. on cross-examinations holmes defense attorney asked one of the agents if there was anything in colorado law that prevented someone with mental illness from making any of these purchases and the agent said no, jenna. jenna: there comes up for one of the first times it is coming up in this preliminary hearing. we know the defense will be calling its own witness. tell us about who those people potentially could be and also how does that procedure, a defense calling witnesses in this preliminary hearing, how typical is that? >> that isn't something that usually happens but legal analysts are saying that what they think is happening here is that the defense is using this opportunity in the hearing to start the process of b
in december, for several hours it is reported by the fbi. we have no word what came out of that. his lawyer all along denied involvement. said his client was only in libya on a construction job. so overnight he was conditionally released by authorities in tunisia. they say for lack of evidence. he is still suspected however, of possible involvement in a terror organization, bill. bill: where does that leave the u.s. now on this investigation? anywhere? >> reporter: well, by all accounts, bill, it really does not look too much advanced since we were last in benghazi in october. one report says it is totally stalled. another report says the probe has not resulted in a single person being charged. at that time time we were talking a few dozen people being questioned but apparently what we saw in benghazi is still the situation there now. security is a problem. militias are strong. attacks on the security forces supposed to be investigating this attack on the consulate seems to be more the norm. there was one arrest, one person being held in relation to a possible terror group in key owe, egypt
interested in what we were doing, and so the assistant director of the fbi for counter-terrorism came to west point and said the fbi could benefit from this kind of education as well. and so they asked west point to go and expand our education for cadets to what we now call practitioner education. we send people from west point and combating and they teach each new about a boc of instruction on terrorism to reinforce the things that are taught at the f.b.i. academy. we also send them out around the nation to be able to work with joint terrorism task forces, which is not just f.b.i. people, but also law enforcement and others to educate them on the terrorist threat and the changes. and then creating a virtual network because of the connections of everybody on the internet so that when pracktigsners that are out there in police departments or the f.b.i. are studying a particular case or aspect of terrorism they can reach back into the literature and research at west point and get a little bit more expertise and the history and the background and the theory that they're able to do. >> what kind
interested in what we were doing, and so the assistant director of the fbi for counter- terrorism came to west point and said the fbi could benefit from this kind of education as well. and so they asked west point to go and expand our education for cadets to what we now call practitioner education. we send people from west point and combating terrorism center down to quantico, virginia, to the fbi academy, and they teach each new agent and new analyst instruction on terrorism to reinforce the kinds of things that are taught at the fbi academy. to come here and be informed about what we are doing to counter terrorism and where that is going. i'll tell you a little bit about that. i do want to state for all of you and especially for c-span these are my personal academic opinions and not the position of the united states government so they have that disclaimer out there. although, as you'll hear as i'm talking about it, i think it should be the position of the united states government. >> we know of osama bin lot and hiding and others hiding in various areas and in other places until the
as well. from dod, fbi, as was dhs. >> even though the fingerprints were found to been on a roadside bomb? >> that we have learned in the aftermath. i would have to defer to dod and the fbi for any specific information on that. but again, all the biographic as well as the biometric checks that were performed at the time did come back clean. but since that time as you have noted we've actually enhanced the program and the security checks, and we now draw upon a greater wealth of intelligence and data holdings on individuals seeking application to the refugee program which greatly enhances our ability to identify derogatory is, compared to earlier. >> does anyone else want to comment on that? so other than the recent iraqi refugee case, have there been many open-source cases of foreigners admitted through the refugee our immigration programs who have been associated with terrorism? and is there any evidence that terrorist groups are successfully exploiting this new u.s. refugees commission broke or or any other refugee program for the specific purpose of gaining entry into the u.s. in commi
me describe the scene inside the apartment. the fbi bomb technician said, there was a fishing line strung across the apartment at a level of about five feet. clearly intended for someone to walk into. it was attached to to a container of glycerin which was up on a shelf above a frying pan that had another material in it. and the idea was for the glycerin to mix with that other material and explode. also in the apartment, napalm, the floor was soaked with gasoline. there were canisters on the floor of some other type of explosive materials. and now it gets -- if that's not enough, it gets more bizarre. outside of the apartment, there was a boom box playing music. next to it, a remote control car that was also intended apparently for someone to go look at the music, maybe play with the remote control car, that would have also set off the explosion. given all of this planning, i think they're trying to show premeditation. also, there was evidence presented yesterday in the afternoon about him buying his ticket. he purchased his ticket online 12 days before the shooting. there was vide
is the f.b.i. as the consecutive order to lead the defense against cyber terrorism but companies have come up with ways to thwart attacks. favorite maneuver to feed wrong information to the hackers to make it doubted what they are dealing with, it confuses them and renderers what they get worthless. this is one effort to combat china and russia who is suspected of bringing down critical infrastructure in the united states. >> if this was physical world and paratroopers descended over silicon valley and guys repelled down ropes and went in and grabbed computers and ran out, there would be missiles flying but it happens every day in the cyber security space. where they come and steal everything and off to some other country they go. >> that intellectual property could include plans for weapons systems and products, track is torsion is one target. computer chips and anything that makes america competitive. the sophisticated software that attacks our critical infrastructure is hidden on home computers every day with american citizens to one-day strike. but the better answer the experts say is
're not going to see a ban on military weapons in civilian hands because how would he enforce it? the fbi would have to go out and start arresting people. >> and again to the point here that john made, you got to, you can enforce what you have br you start to add new things. thanks very much to both of you. now, let's talk to a lawmaker with a plan of his own to stop gun violence. senator richard blumenthal of connecticut. senator, great to talk to you. it's been a while and i'm glad to see you. you're proposing a bill on ammunition background checks and i want to talk about that in a moment, but first, i want to talk about this issue. there are a lot of gun laws in america. brookings has put the number at 300. some have said it's as high as 20,000, but a department of justice study found that 80% of inmates obtained their guns illegally. so 80% of inmates for gun laws obtained their guns illegally. isn't the first thing to do to enforce the laws we have? >> absolutely right. terrific point and it's a point that i make constantly because my background is in law enforcement. i was attorney gener
defaulting on everything, and really i mean everything else. the fbi will shut down, people responsible for tracking down loose nuclear weapons, the court system closes its doors. the faa off line, parks closed, food safety inspections, they stop, nobody gets tax refunds or fixes your roads. it is bad, second, meanwhile, too, the financial markets will go into complete chaos, u.s. government debt is after all the safest investment in the world, so it is used as the benchmark for all other types of debt. what that means, when you buy a mortgage the government looks at what it pays to borrow and begins your estimate there. if we spike the treasury rate because nobody trusts our government anymore that spikes credit card rates and mortgage rates. not to mention all manner of trillions and trillions of dollars of weird financial derivatives that are also bench marked to treasuries. the damage to the economy on that would be unbelievable. and it would occur at every level from individuals looking for a loan to get a house to hedge funders trying to play the markets. so it would be like 2008
of auditors and criminal investigators. more than the fbi. it's not just our size, mandate, or unique authority that is important. it is how we and how i view our mission and how our agency sees that mission. when i joined sigar, i made it clear on the first day that you should view this as a mission and not as a job. if you see this as a job, as a place to retire in place, you should leave, because i only wanted people with fire in the belly, because we have a limited amount of time to do good in the construction in afghanistan. i have used that fire in the belly speech so much that my chief of staff has coined a new term called "fitb." it has worked. i am proud of my 200 agents, auditors, and investigators, because they all have that fire in the belly. they can work elsewhere. some of them are working in the worst conditions. they're working in conditions as bad as our military is in afghanistan. many of them are housed in the same facilities. they take the mission because they believe in it. that is the difference with sigar. that's why i think we can make a difference. i also told
with a small "a" and i was apprehended shortly after i appeared on your show by the fbi. for a number of reasons, because i felt the prosecution was political against myself, i chose to flee into exile. i am in canada now. my name is known to most people. you could research the and find out who i am. i have altered by apparent since have gone into exile. i took the name "x" because i kind of like it. >> has explained the video -- explain it to video that your group anonymous got ahold of, with this 12-minute video showed. >> it is apparent to anyone who can stomach watching of the entire 12 minutes. i, myself, we've been working night and day on this operation. i have watched it a dozen times and it makes me sick each time to watch it. i think it speaks for itself. these young men were sitting around immediately after the crime took place, which is clear from what they say in the video. one person even gets up at one point and leaves in disgust and goes to check on the victim to see if she is ok. the victim is still nearby. the crime is still in progress, in essence, when this video w
resistance he agreed to an fbi interrogation. no comment from the fbi on the substance of that. his lawyers say he was in libya at the time but he was on a construction job. sources say while he is freed he has to remain in the tunisian capital, tunis, he is still charged with suspected involvement after terror organization, joon. jon: he is the only suspect arrested where does that leave the u.s. in this >> reporter: the fbi confirmed to me they have an ongoing investigation and they have agents on the ground in lib a they can't say much more than that. by all accounts this probe is not much more advanced since we were in benghazi in october. one report says it is totally stalled. another says no one has been charged and that all suspects remain on the loose. the problem it appears very little cooperation on the ground in libya. we saw it in benghazi. security remains a big issue. militias are still strong. they are doing attacking of people that should be doing the investigating. so you see the problems. one suspect was questioned in december in cairo with possible links, both to the atta
interviewed. there were clues in the fbi. the fbi did not talk to the cia. we came up with a model that fixed the pentagon. the pentagon used to have the services staffing and fighting separate wars. they would equip themselves separately. we decided to do what the military did. a joint command was created. he can come from any military service. they now trained and equipped to gather. -- togetherthe dni is the joint commander across 16 intel agencies. he leverage is their strength to produce intel products. that is the backbone of how we get intelligence to policy makers and that has dramatically improved. on the fusion centers, that is a different thing. those are local centers that have gone up to serve local law enforcement. they pull together national intelligence streams that they get from the homeland security department or the fbi with streams of local intelligence and a share it. the homelands department has tried to insist on privacy in these agencies and provide some financial support. this is a work in progress. some of them worked very well. one in los angeles works very well. ot
counterterrorism director, jeff porter, he has briefed the fbi on the situation, and chris lawrence. our pentagon correspondent. chris, let me start with you. the state department says we have to do the job right. the defense department says the united states will be involved in mali. what are you hearing tonight as far as u.s. intervention? >> they're narrowing down the option. piloted planes to gather some intelligence is one option. drones, although one official told me those are in very high demand with things going on in yemen and afghanistan, libya and other areas around the world. he said look for possibly some air lift capacity. in other words, big cargo planes that would allow the french to get more equipment to where it's needed in mali, and refueling capability. in other words, the french jets doing some of the bombing, these american refueling tankers could pull up alongside them, and the french jets could refuel in air so they could go longer and further without having to come back to a base. >> interesting options. they're so eager to say there won't be mass combat troops on the gro
for ambassador rice. he's been told it was the director of national intelligence, the f.b.i., the c.i.a. but says -- quote -- "this ever-changing story should be resolved." back to you guys in new york. brian, do you think he'll be out for a year? >>brian: we're going to find out today, if he flies to pensacola, florida, in the owner's plane to find out if the l.c.l. and a.c.l. is torn. we'll see. there is a lot of swelling. but i heard that you will personally go over to his house and ice his knee down, molly. is that true? >> i am a very loyal fan. whatever it takes. >>gretchen: we should preface by saying you are a huge redskins fan. >>brian: i had no idea. >>gretchen: she's wearing the colors even today. >>brian: can you seed that field? it is the worst field in the league. the grass is lumpy. >> we're the team in the tradition of the hogs. we're not worried about the field. play football. don't complain about the field. play football. >>brian: play football but his knee is a little unwieldy. >> curt cousins should have been in. >>brian: she is our correspondent in the bureau but yet she want
of -- group of federal and state7 officials with the fbi, homeland security and secret service and agents who fight tears and. they have pretty well figured out a qaeda domestically in terms of violence and it's pretty unlikely with the exception of small bombing that anything large would have been. but to say they don't have a handle on the infiltration going on by al qaeda through domestic intelligence agencies and the defense department so on. what they tell me as al qaeda has pretty well figured out, and the other islamist terrorist, they can't be the west by blowing us up but they will have two use use the taxes that the soviets use against us in 1930s and 40s. in fact as you go on the msha and i would challenge you that, google with the left said about challenges to the infiltration of islamic terrorism into america. what what you find his is ridiculed. you will recall when several members of congress raised the issue of hillary clinton's top aides mullah of the dean having islamic connections and that in fact told me that you cannot even get the question of infiltration by islamic7 te
released by the fbi, december saw the most background checks for gun sales since the agency's current system was in place in 1988. overall gun checks surged by 19% in 2012 from the previous year. potential gun buyers have been flocking to gun shows in record numbers all across the country since the shooting in newtown, connecticut, possibly worried about new restrictions in the coming months. >> we know that there's going to be some new laws. so, i kind of put it off and put it off until now. now, you know, we went through and came down here to get what we wanted before everything is illegal. bill: gun shows on the whole facing controversy. recent shows in the northeast were canceled following the newtown shooting, also angering gun advocates. martha: let's go back to d.c. now and the battle over taxes and spending and the nation's crushing debt. top democrats are now signaling they want to go back and get more of your money in the debt ceiling debate that is coming, despite the fiscal cliff deal that saw taxes go up 77% of americans. nancy pelosi says it is not enough money really th
the $14.4 billion that funds the f.b.i., the d.e.a., the secret service, the a.t.f. and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal, because in 1986 when this all began, i.n.s. comprised 28% of the spending of all of the other law enforcement agencies. and if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that very clearly shows this and what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. border enforcement by far is the largest share of this spending. it's the largest spending for everything in the immigration system, all of the other immigration functions, and among other things it's made possible the doubling of the border patrol in just the last eight years from $10,819 to where it stands today which is in the neighborhood of 21,370. but even though c.v.p. and its growth is enormous, the growth of i.c.e. is also very substantial. that growth has been 87% since 2005, from a number of $3.1 billion to today about $5.9 billion. so those are the big framing points that i hope paints a picture of what it is that we're doing in this report. let m
. she vanished from outside a grocery store in november of 1998. the f.b.i. is holding a news conference at 10:00 to provide an update regarding future excavation of a well site. her mother has been waiting for d.n.a. test on a bone fragment where searry am killers buried victims around the time she vanished. >> big problems with the trains. what is happening? >> we have a capital corridor delay, when a pedestrian was hit by a train at fremont, train 523. we have a lasting -- lot of fogn the san mateo bridge and expect delays. >> thank you. the dense fog will be >> and check where the fog is thickested less than a quarter mile visibility in livermore and san mateo. above freezing with a lot of 30's and mid-40's and on the way to mid-to-upper 50's. tonight is in the 40's. a few 30's inland but no freezing fog. we have [ cheers and applause ] >>> look at the models in our runway right here on times square this morning. a whole lot of excitement. we're covering every hot spot in america this morning. we have josh down in miami for tonight's big game. big college football championship. there
are people who have been cleared for transfer, that the cia and department justice and the fbi and the burden of defense has looked at and concluded that we're not going to prosecute them, we don't have evidence and we don't believe they present a significant risk and we don't want to keep them. but they have been sitting year after year at guantanamo because of their citizenship. trust the yemeni government to be responsible for the detainee's which i find interesting. the justification for the drone program is that we have the consent of the yemeni government. they are defined government when they give consent to kill people but not trust for the one comes to taking detainee's. it seems we are a bit hypocritical in our view of yemen. i think guantanamo remains a stain on our reputation. recently, congress passed a bill that prohibits granting visas to members of the russian government who abuse human rights violations. president obama signed it. in retaliation, the russian government passed a bill that prohibits americans from adopting russian children and president vladimir putin before s
it was available, a price tag that $18 billion. that is 24% greater than the $14.4 billion that funds the fbi, dea, secret service, and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal. in 1986 when this all began, we comprise less than 25% of all of the spending of all of the other law-enforcement agencies. if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that shows what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. it is by far the largest share of spending. among other things, it is me doubling of the border patrol in his just the last eight years from 10,819 words since today the 21,370. even though it's growth is enormous, the gross growth of i.c.e. is also substantial. it has been 21% since 2005. it is about 5.9 billion today. those are the big framing points that help paint the picture of what it is we are doing in this report. let me now go to the couple of pillars that i will go to to try and frame this for you. this has been built. therefore, what is in place allows for the targets based on information in rapid response. and it is not subjective
and criminal investigators, more than any other ig, more than any other fbi but it's not just her size in our mandate or unique authorities that is important. it's how we and how i view our mission and how are agency views our mission. when i joined sigar, i made it clear on the first day i got there that you should view this as a mission calm, not as a job. if you view this as a job, if you view it as a place to retire and play, you should leave because i only want people and it's a term i use, with fire in the valley because belly because we have a limited amount of time to do good in reconstruction in afghanistan. i abuse that fire in the belly speech so much that my chief of staff has coined a new term called 50 fire in the belly. aphis be memos and you know something, it worked. i am proud of my 200 agent auditors and investigators because they all have that ire in the belly. they could work elsewhere elsewhere. they are working in conditions as bad as our military is in afghanistan but many of them are housed in the same facility. there are men and women, but they take that mission beca
50 handgun murders according to the fbi. the expanding right to carry concealed weapons makes us less safe. what right is being protected if not the right to be safe. the right to feel safe, the expense of actual safety, good stuff by shriver in the new republic. he says how many of the nearly 300,000 children killed by firearms in the u.s. this year does the good of hunting justify? all of them? a handful? how many of the students and faculty at virginia tech. what's so good about hunting? hunting for sport is about as vile as we humans get. he's going after all of the -- literally. bush speechwriter matthew sculley said most wicked deeds are done because the doer proposes for himself. he prefers dark tons light. he gets nothing except the satisfaction of saying something that wanted to live is dead. can someone explain to me why that's acceptable or why the love of death should be more important than the safety of the 94% of us who don't have hunting licenses and don't hunt? >> if you're killing the deer for the meat, that's one thing or you're culling the herd like the wasting -- b
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)